The Flipped Learning Model in Implementing Educational Programs at Chıldren's Art School

Abstract

The article presents one model of implementing the concept of blended learning in children's art school. It is a model of flipped learning, the most effective in implementing the concept of blended learning in the system of additional art education. Information and communication technologies in implementing the flipped learning model provide additional opportunities to create a personalized educational space for learners. The personalized educational space has such a design that learners take more responsibility for their own learning outcomes. There is a contradiction between the need to build a system of personalized education in children's art schools and the insufficient implementation of this system in practice. We propose a model to resolve this contradiction. The purpose of the article is to represent the concept of using the flipped learning model to implement general educational programs of additional education in the field of visual and decorative arts. In developing this model, we followed the concept of developing additional education for children, which provides for the informatization and personalization of the educational environment. Results. We developed the concept of using the flipped learning model in the learning process at the children's art school, and tested it on the basis of the children's art school of Belgorod. The analysis of the model approbation resulted in the following findings. First, this model creates opportunities for personalized educational trajectories of students. Secondly, when students get the opportunity to participate in the goal setting and evaluation of their own educational results, they take more responsibility.

Keywords: Blended learningflipped learningpersonalized learning

Introduction

The current requirements for the additional education programme include the creation of a personalized educational environment which should use information and communication technologies, along with traditional ones. The application of the flipped learning model allows to implement new learning scenarios based on the ideas of the constructivist approach (Malushko, 2015; Tarakanov et al., 2019). The essence of the constructivist approach is to review the role of the student in the learning process and to give him more subjectivity, to allow determining learning objectives and ways to achieve them, to participate in the evaluation of his learning outcomes (Özkarslı & Gürdal, 2010; Zhang & Kou, 2012).

Problem Statement

To date, there are no practices of using the flipped learning model in implementing general education programs of additional education in the field of visual and decorative arts. The analysis of existing general educational programs of additional education in the field of visual and decorative arts showed that they mostly do not provide for the introduction of the flipped learning model. Designing and implementing general educational programs of additional education in the field of visual and decorative arts of new generation resulted from the desire to transform the familiar learning scenarios, supplement them with innovative methods of educational work.

Research Questions

  • What are the features of the flipped learning model in implementing general education programs of additional education in the field of visual and decorative art?

  • Is it possible to personalize learning by implementing the flipped learning model in children's art schools?

  • How can the principles of constructivist learning be presented when implementing the flipped learning model at children's art schools?

Purpose of the Study

To present the concept of using the flipped learning model in implementing general educational programs of additional education in the field of visual and decorative arts. In developing this model, we followed the concept of developing additional education for children, which provides for the informatization and personalization of the educational environment (Suzdalova et al., 2017).

Research Methods

The research methodology consists, firstly, of reviewing current research on the problem under study and, secondly, of analysing the experience of general education schools that use elements of blended learning. A review of the professional literature has shown the current interest of researchers in using the flipped learning model in the learning process (Awidi & Paynter, 2019; Sun & Xie, 2020; Vollmer & Drake, 2020).

Findings

We have proposed recommendations for the introduction of the flipped learning model into the implementation of general education programs of additional education in children's art school (Lizunkov et al., 2020). The article provides the model of blended flipped learning to implement the programs of additional art education in the realization of the program "Color Science" for children aged 12-14 years. This program follows a modular learning principle and includes 5 modules: "Introduction. Color circle", "Chromatic and achromatic colors", "Color scale", "Contrasting harmonies", "Natural associations". Each module represents the structural element of the programme that aims to form a specific group of learners' competences and has clearly defined learning outcomes (Ferreira et al., 2017). The learning outcomes are created by the student, so that every child learning this educational program, in accordance with the ideas of a constructivist approach, is aware of the goals of his or her learning and has the opportunity to choose the optimal one for him or her (as the researchers note, the child first of all chooses the goal that is in the area of his or her nearest development). The formulation of learning objectives uses the taxonomy of R. Marzano's learning objectives (Figure 1 ) as a basis (Marzano, 2000).

Figure 1: Taxonomy by R. Marzano (source https://developingcreativelearnersjack.wordpress.com/)
Taxonomy by R. Marzano (source https://developingcreativelearnersjack.wordpress.com/)
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Each module has a design that allows students to consistently obtain new knowledge (information in R. Marzano's taxonomy), master such thought operations (mental operations in R. Marzano's taxonomy), apply the obtained knowledge in practice (physical operations in R. Marzano's taxonomy). The three-level target system of the module (1, 2, 3) contributes to this. The objectives of level 1 correspond to the stages of remembrance and understanding of the obtained knowledge (information and mental operations) of the Marzano taxonomy, objectives of level 2 correspond to the stages of understanding and analysis of the obtained knowledge (mental operations, physical operations), objectives of level 3 correspond to the stage of knowledge application (physical operations). This goal setting ensures that the learning process is measurable and personalized (Table 1 ).

Table 1 -
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The module uses an inverted learning model to master it. Theoretical classes (2 hours) are held in the format of e-learning using the resource Core. The remote presentation format of the training material allows students to choose their own pace of learning (Malushko et al., 2016; Sun et al., 2018). The first theoretical lesson covers the theoretical issues of the module, the second covers the historical aspects of the development of coloration. Teaching material for theoretical classes consists of two trajectories, each of which includes two tasks for studying new material and one test task (Politsinskaya et al., 2019). Students choose one of the trajectories depending on their preferred form of presentation: for example, the first trajectory contains a text format for assignments and the second one contains audio and video materials on the topic of the lesson. Practical classes (2 hours) are held in the school's classrooms, where students practice the theoretical knowledge gained. The last lesson is the final task, which involves both individual and collaborative work of all students in the group.

Conclusion

The practical use of this model of flipped learning allows creating a personalized educational space in the institution of additional education, the opportunity for the student to participate in selecting goals and forms of education that contributes to their motivation. The proposed model is applicable in the implementation of general development programs of additional education in the field of visual arts and decorative arts.

Acknowledgments

Our gratitude to the pedagogical staff of MBISE "Children's Art School of Belgorod", who took part in the practical testing of this model.

References

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Publisher

European Publisher

First Online

28.12.2020

Doi

10.15405/epsbs.2020.12.04.86

Online ISSN

2357-1330